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Tasting Wine

This page has four sections:

Useful Books

Michael Broadbent: Winetasting  
Jancis Robinson: How To Taste

The Frugal OenophoileIf you want to support the local economy, buy a copy of The Frugal Oenophile's Lexicon of Wine Tasting Terms.  It is a 64 page reference guide of definitions and concepts pertinent to wine, published by Oakville based writer and educator Richard Best.  It can be obtained in Toronto at The Cookbook Store, 850 Yonge Street.  Otherwise, mail a cheque directly to Mr Best as per the instructions on his website.  The cost is approximately $10.

 

As an alternative, Seranata Wines has a useful on line glossary of tasting terms.

   

 

Useful Sites

Toronto Vintners Club Wine Tasting 101The Toronto Vintners Club has a useful section for neophyte tasters.  Learn all about the four basic steps -  colour; swirl; bouquet (or smell); taste and aftertaste.

 

Taste TourTaste Tour is a Napa Valley-based publisher of guides and posters on the major wines of the world.  Their blurb says....."Are you looking for a quick wine reference when entertaining or the perfect gift for friends or family members who are interested in wine? Would you like to know more about the following grapes but don't want to read several long, boring books: Chardonnay; Cabernet Sauvignon; Pinot Noir; Merlot; Sauvignon Blanc; Zinfandel."

Tongue Tastes

The tongue is important to your sense of taste, but it can only recognize four different sensations.  Because each part of the tongue is responsible for a designated taste sensation, wine must be swished around in the mouth for it to reach all areas.Picture of the tongue

 

 

 

 

Wine Serving Temperatures

Dry white wines are best consumed between 14C and 16C - 58F to 62F.  An hour in the fridge or 20 minutes in icy water will bring it to the right temperature.

Sweet white wines such as icewine can be served colder.

Red wines should be served at slightly cooler than room temperature, say 18C or 65F.


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                                                                    Last Updated:    June 1, 2014